Lake Resia

Resia lake is an artificial lake in the western portion of South Tyrol, Italy.

Approximately 2 km (1 mi) south of the Reschen Pass, which forms the border with Austria, and 3 km east of the mountain ridge forming the border with Switzerland. Its surface area of 6.6 km² makes it also the largest lake above 1,000 m in the Alps. It is fed by the Adige, Rojenbach and Karlinbach and drained by the Adige.

The lake is famous for the steeple of a submerged 14th-century church; when the water freezes, this can be reached on foot. A legend says that during winter one can still hear church bells ring. In reality the bells were removed from the tower on July 18, 1950, a week before the demolition of the church nave and the creation of the lake.

Origins of the Lake[edit]

Plans for a smaller (5 m deep) artificial lake date from 1920. In July 1939, the Montecatini company (now Edison Energia) introduced a new plan for a 22 m (72 ft)-deep lake, which would unify two natural lakes (Reschensee and Mittersee) and submerge several villages, including Graun and part of Reschen. The creation of the dam started in April 1940 pursuant to this second plan but, due to the war and local resistance, did not finish until July 1950.